First Crack, Silverskin, Melanoids, …

… and today’s topic is? Roasting!! How’s it done? What happens? Why is freshly roasted better?

Last month we had a small bag of coffee that was roasted three months prior, in its original unopened bag, that was stored at a cool room temperature. It was fun to compare it side by side with coffee that had been roasted a few days earlier. You could already see the difference during the bloom part of the pour-over (when you just wet the grounds to let them release their carbon dioxide). There were more bubbles with the fresher coffee. The freshly roasted coffee definitely tasted more flavorful and better, but the 3-month old coffee wasn’t bad at all.

I’m not a pro. I’m not good at remembering or taking descriptive notes for a single tasting (of coffee, wine, food, etc.). I can tell differences with direct comparisons, as I’m sure you can, too.

Since I’m not a pro, I try to share with you articles I find interesting on coffee-related topics, and I hope to pique your interest so you might do a quick experiment one random time you’re making coffee. I confess that I don’t drink coffee every day (for various reasons), yet I want the coffee I drink to be good coffee. And I do like to occasionally test things that I’ve learned about. But there’s a time and place for everything. I still drink diner coffee if I go out for breakfast, because several cups of coffee with breakfast out is part of my enjoyable experience. Increasingly, though, I’m initially taken aback at how bad breakfast joint coffee is. It’s hot, it’s often freshly made because they’re constantly serving it, but it isn’t very good.

To the articles …

Once you experiment, you have to decide for yourself if it’s better to order a smaller amount more frequently (& pay shipping), or buy more at one time for convenience & less shipping cost.

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